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No doubt this is the first of many more posts regarding the oh so beautiful, Autumn Rose Pullover.  As most of you know, prep work is a crucial part to any project.  In fact, it’s just plain stupid to skip this step.

STEP ONE: Scour Ravelry and read as many descriptions of other people’s Autumn Rose as you can.  Next to checking gauge, this step can also save you a lot of tears and heartache.  A lot of my prep work was taken from advice that others gave.  I LOVE Ravelry!!  What an awesome tool.

STEP TWO: Recreate chart!   I would love to meet the person who made this chart and ask them if they seriously thought someone could actually use it.  It’s teeny tiny and uses  a light gray as the contrast color.  Not even my scanner could pick up the pattern clearly.  So, enter Excel and at least one hour of recreating the chart.  While it was a PITA (pain in the ass), it will certainly be very useful.

STEP THREE: Draw schematic and take measurements!  (Advice from a Raveler!)  Here is how I did this…Use a sheet of graph paper and let each box represent 1″ in life size.  I started with how long, from top of shoulder to bottom I wanted the pullover to be and went from there.  Noting, how deep I want the scoop neck to be and so on.  Since this pullover will not be stretchy, it is important to take accurate measurements!

STEP FOUR: Next, I whipped up a swatch in order to check my gauge.  Normally checking gauge is boring (SO necessary though!!!), but not with this pullover.  Getting to see a small little preview of what this beautiful sweater will someday be was very rewarding.  Using size 2 Adi Turbo needles, my gauge was spot on.

STEP FIVE: Break out calculator and have fun with some numbers to determine how many stitches to cast on!  This part always freaks me out a bit.  However, ever since I made Diane’s Dress, I am a lot more confident in this area.  It’s important to re-check multiple times.  You do NOT want to mess this part up.  I also took into consideration how many stitches each “Rose” consisted of.  Since this pullover is worked in the round form the bottom up, I did not want one of the ‘rose’s’ to just stop in the middle and the next begin.

STEP SIX: Cast on and let the real fun begin!!

Its been a couple of days since cast on and I am still making my way through the bottom ribbing (300+ stitches per round takes forever!).  The yarn (Jamieson’s Shetland Spindrift) is way different from anything I have ever used.  I normally pick yarn based off  of softness and this yarn is anything but soft.  It’s very wiry and took a bit to used to, especially while doing color work.  On the plus side, because of the wiriness, the fair isle really holds together and looks stunning.   As soon as I have something a little more interesting than ribbing, I will take some photos and share!